I have been wondering about Green politics in Ukraine: as all over the world, it seems that the more energy self-sufficient a country is, the better it will be able to resist dependency on any foreign power. My correspondent in Lviv, political analyst Lyuddmyla Pavlyuk, answered my questions, and with her permission I share her letter here. Green Voices in Ukraine: a Letter from Lyuddmyla Pavlyuk Green voices in Ukraine are individual than rather than party-related. The official structures of the green movement are not really popular. For example, the Green party of Ukraine had parliamentary representation only until 2002. The reason is very simple: Ukrainian oligarchs wanted to use the party‚Äôs brand to get to parliament, and people felt that the party was not really independent and concerned with the environment. So, if ecological problems appear at the nationwide or local level, people create problem-oriented groups and look for…

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              I promised another post on Ukraine, and after the warm welcome I was given in Oxford, there may well be more. My on-going correspondence with translator Steve Komarnyckyj (right, in photo) has evolved into conversations with his partner S.J. Speight, with whom he runs Kalyna Language Press; and, in Ukraine, poet Ihor Pavlyuk (left, in photo) and his wife Lyudmyla Pavlyuk, herself a professor of journalism, so there is plenty to share. Today I’ll give some brief impressions of Ihor’s poetry and, at her request, reproduce a political article by Lyudmyla, published yesterday by The Wilson Centre. I am already convinced of her central point that the invasion of Crimea must cause the world to look very differently at Russia, and I was struck by her argument that Russia should pay reparation for its crime there. Like boycott, reparation is a non-violent response…

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          Given the current crisis in Ukraine, and my own lack of expertise in the country’s history and politics, it is humbling indeed to be included in English PEN’s Ukrainian Poetry Evening in Oxford this Thursday, featuring poet Ihor Pavlyuk and translator Steve Komarnyckyj reading from A Flight over the Black Sea, published this month by Waterloo Press. As well as an honour, it is also a responsibility that I don’t take lightly. I therefore wanted to take the opportunity to publically thank Steve Komarnyckyj and Susie Speight of Kalyna Language Press for extending the invitation, and English PEN for approving it. I would also like to express some of my own thoughts and feelings about the worsening situation in Ukraine – an analysis that is indebted to Steve’s dedicated Tweets and personal emails over the last weeks. But to begin by introducing Ihor’s work, to…

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